IndieTech

U.S. Government Sees Value In Mobile Apps

You just know that a trend is significant when the government is jumping on the train, even if we have to say that we are seeing much more apparent consumer technology focus in the U.S. government than ever before. However, we think it is noteworthy to say that the U.S. government now has its own app store. So far, there are 18 applications available, but a list of government apps shows that there are 109 different apps that are already available or are currently developed for public and non-public use.

14 apps in the “app store” are available for mobile web use, seven for the iPhone, two for Android and one for Blackberry devices. The apps reach from a general White House app, to a NASA app, FBI’s most wanted, embassy information, product recalls, FEMA and TSA information, an alternative fuel finder or a BMI calculator. It appears that the government wants to do more as it encourages site visitors to submit ideas for more apps.

All applications are provided to the public free of charge.

We are still at the beginning, but It’s good to see the government providing its services on mobile devices. Of course, there is no consistency of platforms yet, but it appears that, as far as smartphones are concerned, the iPhone may the favored platform.

Does the government use secure apps?

If there is a concern about cloud applications that we here of these days, then it certainly is the security of cloud apps. Where is the data stored? How secure is the environment? Can it be as secure as if you were to store the data locally? Of course it can and we invite to contact us for details how secure your data is. However, Google has some news that will change perceptions.

The company announced a government version of its cloud Apps, commonly known as Google Apps. Also, Google said that Google Apps is the first suite of cloud computing applications to receive Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) certification and accreditation from the U.S. government. The FISMA law applies to all information systems in use by U.S. federal government agencies to help ensure they are secure.

While the certification applies to Google’s Apps only, it shows the growing confidence over the value of cloud apps and more education that delivers a message that cloud computing in fact can be secure – so secure that it can match the highest standards. What is so sweet about cloud applications is that their security is not fixed and not stuck like a local application would. It can evolve and improve with new trends and requirements.

Google said that it will be continuing to add cloud apps to its government offering. At this time, Google Apps for Government stores Gmail and Calendar data in a segregated system that is, according to Google, located in the continental United States. Other applications will follow in the near future, the company said.